north shore getaway + thoughts on leaving minnesota (pt 1)

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Two days after we decided to move from Minnesota to Maryland, I texted my oldest friend and asked “what’s been the hardest part about leaving Minnesota.” He answered, “Leaving Minnesota.”

On Monday, I turned 26, and on the Tuesday before, my partner surprised me with a two-day getaway to the North Shore, so I could see Lake Superior one last time. He knows this lake is sacred to me (as it is for so many). Growing up, my parents called it our “happy place,” and it remains a place of peace and power for me.

His plan was for us to spend Tuesday in Duluth, and Wednesday visiting my favorite spots along the shore. A day to connect, a day to explore.

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Duluth is special to Chris and I as the place where we solidified our budding relationship. As much as this getaway was about my birthday and saying goodbye to Minnesota, it was a quiet celebration of us. It was easy, once we reached the lakewalk, to slip into some of our nostalgia. Last summer, the bay sparkled. We arrived at the golden hour, and the sun lay on top of the water like a silk. This year, the bay was stained red from iron and mud kicked up from weeks of torrential rain. Different a year later, but so are we.

We did what you do in Canal Park: Walk to the piers, walk the lift bridge, watch it rise for sailboats, walk the boardwalk until the crowds thin. We visited Vikre Distillery in the shadow of the lift bridge, and sampled gin, aquavit and whiskeys distilled in sight of the cocktail room. Later, we ate at Canal Park Brewing, a brewery with an excellent menu. Vikre was beautiful, the spirits an homage to passion and knowledge, and Canal Park Brewing Company is always a treat. (The food in Duluth trends heavy and American.)

We talked about everything. This next year will be big for us, but the way we talk about moving reminds me of what a friend once said about her pregnancy: it’s too big to talk about every day. Having hours without agenda let us roam. This is the beginning of something we can’t fully see. We agree that Maryland is temporary, but how temporary? And what comes after Maryland? We’ve each had thoughts about school or about my writing that excite me as much as they scare me. It’s the most fantastic learning curve to have a partner who actively supports the dreams that, six months ago, I didn’t think were worth pursuing.

As the afternoon stretched into evening, I grew quiet, so quiet Chris asked me if I was upset. Of course not, of course not. I process the world through words — if I’m not talking, I’m writing — but their volume can sometimes be an assault.

Admittedly, I barely understand how to be present in a moment, but I think it’s something like this. The experience of the evening — cool air off the lake, and lapping water, and his hand in mine — was too complete, too exquisite for more words. It was enough — it was everything — to just be in it. Happy, I told him, so happy.

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I wrote too much for anyone to read in one sitting. Part two coming soon.

packing a life into boxes

 

I’ve done it so many times I don’t have a count anymore, but every time I pack my life into boxes, I’m flooded. Both with the amount of stuff I own, and, as I touch every item in my home, the emotional terrain each item comes with.

I’m not a pack-rat or a minimalist. I live for the feeling of clear cupboards and manageable drawers, but I’m hesitant to toss stuff that I’ve spent my money on, because will I kick myself in a month when I need to purchase a new fillintheblank? A cousin once told me that if he’s considering discarding something he can replace for under $15, he lets it goo. But I also grew up watching my mom be meticulous about our possessions — sometimes to the point she was discarding items we very much need in our daily life.

I don’t have answers. Our relationship with our stuff is so complicated. It’s fraught with our own layers of emotional complexity, but also with socio-economics and the politics of wealth inequality.

Our objects tie us to the multitudes of who we’ve been. I have a bookmark with a giraffe a mother cross-stitched for me when I was nine after I lent her daughter a piece of clothing at a summer camp, because I like being reminded of the first time I remember consciously choose to set aside my own anxieties for someone else’s inclusion. Last summer, I filled trashed bags of clothing, because I didn’t want my closet to remain a reminder of of all the ways I compromised my worth. My boyfriend and I are moving two full sets of Harry Potter books across the country (plus the beginnings of a third, illustrated set), because this story shaped our childhoods and adolescences in separate, but powerful ways. Do we need three copies of the Sorcerer’s Stone in one house (especially when you consider I’ve read it so many times I can repeat the first page from memory)?

At the beginning of the year, I had a vision of white space. I wanted to clear room. Why, I wasn’t sure, and for what, I didn’t know. If I’m learning to have faith in anything, it’s that we are receiving preparation for what comes next. I was creating space between the narratives that frame my life, and the desires those narratives found conflict with. I needed clarity to make the decision we made three months ago.

We’re weeks away from the materialization of that “white space” I wanted. A cross-country move, and a place to live where we know no one except the HR departments who hired us. I said to a friend that this move feels less like an outright opportunity, and more like the opportunity for opportunities.

Six months ago, I cleared my home of anything that was unnecessary or reminded me of pain. Now that I’m packing what’s left, the question has shifted “do you need this enough to haul it cross-country,” and the answers aren’t as clear. There’s math I need to consider, how much does the trailer hold, what can we afford to replace, what must we just part with, but then the equations get messy. How do you fit what you need in a trailer, but first, how do you know what you need when you leave home for the first time? How much of you collection do you keep out of comfort? And how warm is that comfort, really? How do you carry all your history with you, and still keep space for new places to become a kind of home?

The question I’m really asking is how to I love the home I’m leaving and still leave room for something new to grow?

did you hear the news?

We’re moving! This August, to the East Coast. Get ready, people. Get excited.

After we made the decision to move, I kept asking my boyfriend “are we really doing this?” Even though we were doing all the things you do when you leave (told our parents, told our bosses, signed contracts, applied for housing, etc.), it didn’t feel real. How could it? We said we’d do this one big thing, and now we’re just doing it?

This will be the first time that either of us move away (away, away, not just to the next zip code) from our homes. I know people move away all the time, but for us, this is the ball game.

We spent last week in the area to which we’ll be moving. Even though we were there for work and at least thirty miles north of the community we’ll be moving to, just being in the same region felt surreal. We descended, and I kept saying “this will be the airport we’ll fly in and out of when we live here.” We walked outside: “This is what the trees will smell like when live here.” We grew sticky in the heat: “This is what the air will feel like when we live here.” Minnesota is my home is such profound and deeply rooted ways that I can barely, barely imagine what it’ll be like to live anywhere else. I looked up at the blue sky, and again: “This is what the sky will look like when I live here.”

Already, I’m enamored with magnolia leaves. They’re thick and glossy, and stand at attention in ways I didn’t expect from tree leaves. Already, I’m intrigued by the history, so much military, so much politics. Our federal/political past has always interested me less than our socio-cultural past. Already, I’m mapping transit stations, because so much is going to be a train ride away. The whole east coast, it seems, will be just a train ride away.

Seeing our soon-to-be state, doing the cross-country move housekeeping, playing tourist in our new backyard. It made it seem – not more real, because it’ll take months to shake the not-in-Minnesota surrealism – but more tangible. This is really going to happen. This is what I was feeling this January, when I said I wanted room. Space, space, more blank space. For what, I didn’t know them.

For this, I guess. For all this.